Interview: Raider Klan | Rvidxr Klvn Part 2: New York (Matt Stoops, Grandmilly, Big Zeem)

Posted: August 24, 2012 in Hip Hop, Interview
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

SpaceGhostPurrp Performs Live at SOB’s with a couple dozen of his NYC homies

Although Raider Klan is often viewed as a kind of 90’s revivalist movement for southern artists, New York is an unofficial second outpost for the Raider Klan.  After all it was in New York, not Florida or Memphis, where SpaceGhostPurrp’s work with A$AP Rocky helped both of them gain national attention and grow both of their vibes.  It was also in New York where Matt Stoops was recently jumped by A$AP Twelvy – an incident that’s been talked about quite a bit on twitter on the internet, but really only a symbolic boiling point in tensions that have been mounting between the two camps for some time due to creative differences, petty slights, and some other incidents that have continued to push the two camps at odds with one another after their previously amicable relationship.  

Despite the fact that Grandmilly may technically be the only New York member who’s made a contribution to the Raider Klan catalog to date (at least in the form of a full album/mixtape that’s received some decent recognition online), few know that Matt Stoops is one of Purrp’s most trusted allies, a friend so close they refer to each other as cousins, and Stoops holds a kind of consigliere status next to Purrp in the Klan’s hierarchy.  Big Zeem plays a similar role in working with Grandmilly and is one of the Klan members who’s interested in turning Raider Klan fashion sense into a clothing line.  I caught up with Milly and Zeem a little over a month ago to talk about their debut, Bandanas & Black Magic and to get a sense of how they fit into the increasingly growing Raider Klan puzzle.  I also caught up with Matt Stoops to get his viewpoint on a few topics as one of few Raider Klan members who actually has a good read on where SpaceGhostPurrp’s head is at, at any given moment.  These are the voices of the New York chapter of the Raider Klan.

Link to Part 1: Memphis (Ethelwulf, Chris Travis, & Yung Raw) and Part 3: Southwest (Amber London, Chris Travis, Yung Raw)

JB: Matt, describe to people your role in Raider Klan.  You’re not a rapper so what’s your role with the Klan.

Matt Stoops:

Nah, I’m not a rapper so it’s like family.  SpaceGhost is like my cousin and I’ve known him probably the longest out of anybody in the Klan and we’re really close and we call each other cousins and shit.  We’re trying to start-up a skate team, but it hasn’t started off yet, we’re trying to get shit together right now and I skate and shit like that.  But other than that, when Purrp is gone and he has like business I try to go take care of that for him if he’s not in town.

JB: How did you meet SpaceGhost?

Matt Stoops:

I’ve known SpaceGhost for about five or six years.  I met him when I went down to Atlanta and shit, just on twitter pretty much and this was back when nobody knew who he was and my friend from Mississippi, who lived down in Atlanta at the time put me onto his music and we started talking on twitter and shit, and this was like before he moved in with Rocky and all that shit.  And we just became really cool and when he moved up to New York he stayed with me for a couple of days before he moved in with Rocky.  And we were always together in New York while he was living with Rocky.

JB: What are some common characteristics that tie a lot of the Raider Klan members together?

Matt Stoops:

I mean a lot of the Raider Klan members on the East Coast like all the ones in Atlanta and all the ones in LA I personally know.  All the ones in Atlanta – I used to live in Atlanta for a little while – all the ones that I know, I put them together, we grew up together in Atlanta and I introduced them to SpaceGhostPurrp, SpaceGhost found out that they were real people, real homies and we all skated so we all kind of came together as like the Atlanta Raider Klan.  And then when I moved to New York and all the kids I grew up with, I introduced them to Purrp and we all kind of formed a New York Raider Klan.  That’s about it.  Most of the LA Raiders, a lot of the Atlanta Raiders are originally from LA, so when they went back to visit in LA they would put their homies down, so that’s how that shit worked out.

JB: Grandmilly & Zeem, talk a little bit about how you got involved with Raider Klan and the recording of Bandanas and Black Magic.

Big Zeem:

 If we kept it funky we recorded the album, what Mills?  Seven days before it dropped?  You were chillin’ in my room and I was like, ‘Yo, you do not have this done.  You need to start working?’

Grandmilly:

Yeah it didn’t take us too long to record it.  The whole thing happened in like the span of a month or two.  Niggas wasn’t rushing it or nothing, but I know niggas were waiting for that shit for mad long.  I did my shit though.

Big Zeem:

We started working on it last winter, we would just get drunk and high and shit and record every day.  I’m not a hypebeast so I’m not really into the industry, so like MTV and shit like that, but it’s like who plays basketball and doesn’t care about the all star game. I can’t wait to like sit down with Flex and tell him how we did Bandanas and shit.  Like how the whole initial process to this shit came up.  Like how Spaceghostpurrp, the first time he met me was just like, ‘yo I feel your vibe.’  The first time he met Milly he was just like, ‘yo, I’m fuckin’ with y’all.’

JB: Any word on an official Raider Klan album?

Matt Stoops:

I think that’s in the works right now.  I’m not too sure though, but I’m pretty sure it’s gonna happen really soon.

JB: Grandmilly & Zeem, talk about the influence of early 90’s NYC on you stylistically, I’ve read before in an interview that you cited influence from Grand Puba and Brand Nubian, and talk to people growing up in Hempstead and that influence:

Grandmilly:  

Brand Nubian isn’t as much as an influence as other shit to be honest.  In terms of early 90’s rap, I listen to like Ice Cube and shit, I like AZ and Nas, and I like all types of shit.

JB: How do you think being from New York gives you a bit of different perspective than some of your fellow Klan members, or does it?

Matt Stoops:

No, I don’t think it does for me.  Only because I lived in Atlanta for five years and being in the south and Atlanta is so diverse it’s like people from every state, there weren’t too many people who were born and raise in Atlanta where I lived, so I got to grow up with kids from Memphis and LA and Chicago so you get a feel of everything.  But I definitely got the feel of the south and the California feel growing up.

JB: I know you work with some other producers, but that you make most of your own beats.  What’s your process like?

Grandmilly:

I usually find like old soul samples, and a lot of funk, some Texas underground shit, and I was looking into doing some like Evelyn ‘Champagne’ (King) shit.  I just used to sit at my computer and listen to mad old ass music.  Like over the years, the music has gotten so ignorant and just ridiculous that I lost touch with that kind of like side of myself.  So I want to that shit, and get back to listening to a lot of that.

JB: Talk about projects you have coming up.  I’ve heard about The Truman Show, is that something that you’re still working on.

Grandmilly:

Yeah that’s an album.  I’m gonna to wait to put that out.   I’ve got a little side project I’m working on now called BlackNWhite (BLVCKNWHITE), with this guy named That Kid – I’m black, he’s white so it’s called BlackNWhite (laughs).

Big Zeem:

I’ve got a bunch of clothes I’m working on and shit.  Controlled Addiction that’s something that was a little brainchild of mine, I actually went to design school, and how this whole Grandmilly thing works, is I don’t rap, it just works out, my creative process, his actual artistry as a rapper you know we mold it together, but I’m working on some new clothes for all the visuals we’re working on right now.  I just designed some jeans for Milly too.

Grandmilly:

I’m wearing them right now actually.

Big Zeem:

(Laughs).  So yeah, I’ve got some more shit coming, you’ll see it on the videos we’re working on.  You’re going to start to see more of the visuals.  Like you said earlier with the 90’s hip hop, we’re trying to bring that back, but not like corny Retro Kidz, I mean I don’t want to diss them or nothing, but we’re not going to buy a pair of burgundy jeans and cut ’em off and get a high top.  Like it’s something it’s not something where we’re bringing 90’s back like that.  But just the essence of it…

Grandmilly:

I mean, if that’s what you do, but I don’t really know anybody who does that though.

Big Zeem:

But that’s a couple of the things that we’re working on right now. Videos, clothes, the BLVCKNWHITE album – I’m actually playing it right now, well half of it, I’m waiting for the white side of the album.

Grandmilly:

I’m looking at finishing my shit in the middle of August, depending on what the guy I’m making it wants to do.  I know you know who Th@ Kid is, you can google him (or find him on twitter @SeeImThatKid).  He’s an awesome director, like that nigga’s the man  at shooting videos.  I like his videos.  I just found him on the internet.

JB: Talk about Hypebeasts in the industry.

Matt Stoops:

I don’t know, we have a lot of hypebeast fans, and I don’t like hypebeasts and shit, but they’re needed in the music industry, because they’re the first to listen to the songs and share the songs and get them out there and shit like that.  I mean it’s a bad and it’s a good thing.  You know?

Grandmilly:

Because we wear the clothes that we like and we don’t really have stylists yet, because we’re not really the niggas that need styles.  A hypebeast to me, a hypebeast is just fashion to me.  I don’t think it’s a nigga that follows trends, I think it’s a nigga who tries to be fashionable, but…

Big Zeem:

Like I was just saying with the Retro Kidz.  Here’s what I was just saying about the Retro Kidz.  Yeah, I understand you like 90’s hip hop, but do you really listen to De La Soul every day?

Grandmilly:

Or do you also listen to MMG and Rick Ross?

Big Zeem:

Do you really walk around with a book bag every day?

Grandmilly:

And a boombox.

Big Zeem:

Or are you doing it because of the hype?  For example, when Lupe first came out in ’06 everybody skateboarded, now nobody has a skateboard anymore.  See what I mean?  Hypebeasts, just going with a movement.   So everybody now wants to have a clique, and have a collective rap group, so that’s the trend of right now.  We just stay true to ourselves, like we’re over that.  Like I grew up Muslim, so that’s how like me, Brand Nubian, and the whole Grand Puba and the whole like Nas and AZ influence came in.

Grandmilly:

Yeah, I don’t want to say I don’t listen to none of that shit, but a lot of that older music, there’s like select songs that just feel certain ways to me, that might have given a certain feeling back in the day, that’s the shit I listen to.  Like I listen to one Grand Puba song like 130 times or I’ll listen to my favorite AZ song, over and over again, ’til the play button breaks.  Like just because a nigga don’t know a whole nigga anthology, or don’t got the whole box set of cds don’t mean we don’t genuinely fuck with the nigga movement and what he was with back in the day.

Big Zeem:

But, nah he’s really tapping into the hypebeasts and how we just separated from them.  You can look at anything.  You can look at the hypebeasts that are running behind Raider Klan.  You can see the different members of Raider Klan and tell who’s Raider Klan, and who’s really a hypebeast, and who’s really just saying ‘I’m Raider Klan because these guys are getting buzz so I should be Raider Klan too.’  Like when A$AP first came out, everybody was A$AP.  Now it’s like three members (laughs), you feel me?

Grandmilly:

That’s real.  It’s like what did you fuck with niggas for?  Like did you fuck with niggas because you just felt like that was the thing to do?  Or you thought you could make some money doing it?  Because, me personally?  I can’t speak about nobody else, but I still don’t got no money doing this shit.  I can’t speak for nobody else.  I would’ve been stopped doing it, if I didn’t think I could take this shit to where nobody’s doing it or taken it.  I feel like I can do it, and I don’t see why I couldn’t.

JB: What do you see as the role of social media – facebook, tumblr, twitter, etc – in the development of Raider Klan?

Matt Stoops:

I don’t think it would exist without twitter.  I think Purrp and all of us kind of came up on twitter and facebook, and youtube and shit like that.  I think that plays a big role in the whole Raider Klan, because I feel like if we weren’t known on twitter or anything, or youtube and shit, we probably wouldn’t be known right now.

JB: Zeem, you mentioned a bit ago that you grew up Muslim, and one of the things I find interesting about Raider Klan music is the return of the use of the terms Gods & Goddesses, which of course was prevalent in rap from the late 80’s through the mid 90’s due to the prevalence of 5%er teachings at that time.  Do you think there a parallel between their use of it and your own?

Big Zeem:

Yeah, I mean, you know what it is…

Grandmilly:  

No, not at all.  The main reason why that whole shit came back is because people are getting superhumanized.  Niggas is homeless, and niggas is going to jail, and niggas is getting locked up and getting out and getting out of the situation and that made them feel like a god.  A nigga could get shot at, at point blank range, and the bullets whiz right past him or they bounce off the wall or whatever, and you feel like God after you make it out.  And I guess goddesses feel like ‘if I go to work every day, and I come home and cook and clean and take care of all my kids – I’m a goddess.’  You feel what I’m saying?

Big Zeem:  

I just feel like when you talk about that whole 90’s, and that whole Brand Nubian, and that whole era – they were saying something.  You feel me?  In the rhymes, it wasn’t just a bunch of bullshit ass raps, you could really feel – that’s what’s really ill about that era – you can still feel that era to this day.  Nowadays, nobody’s saying nothing.  That’s why an artist like Frank Ocean’s hot, because he’s bringing back that real, real music.

Grandmilly: 

Yeah his shit is wavy.

Big Zeem:

Yeah, you feel me?  That music you can feel.  And that’s where the parallel between the gods and goddesses comes in, we all feel like we’re all young gods.  You’ll hear some of the gods and goddesses influences in Milly’s album from him being around me.  You know, I’ve been knowing Milly since like the sixth grade and we went to Middle School and High School together and Milly fuckin’ lived with me and shit, so that’s my brother.  Me when I was younger, I used to go to the mosque and he was never really took to it, but he always respected the Nation and whatever I was doing so that’s where you see a lot of the influence in the music from the gods, and you hear Dr. Benjamin Chavis on the album, and the Belly scene.  That’s where that comes from.

Grandmilly: 

Yeah, I liked the fact that you can put a scene from a movie in a song and niggas will listen to it, every time they listen to the song, they listen to it, they get it with the interludes and everything.  That shit is crazy.


“Bandanas & Black Magic Commercial”

JB: Do you think the view of women in Raider Klan music is different from the view of women in hip hop in general?

Matt Stoops:

Yeah, I think like Amber London, she has a different style from most female rappers today, because she’s like on that old school shit.  And I feel like there’s not a lot of female rappers doing that, because they’re kind of on the mainstream route, and she’s like kind of like going the same direction as Purrp.

JB: You guys mentioned A$AP a while back when we were talking about hypebeasts.  I just wanted to touch for a second on…

Big Zeem:

It ain’t just with A$AP though.  That’s even when Odd Future came out, everybody was Wolf Gang.  It’s whatever’s hot at the moment.  It’s like four years ago, ’08, that’s when everybody became fashionable that’s when Kanye came out with the 808’s and Heartbreak shit and everybody was fashionable, and I have my own clothing line.  It’s not just people… No, it is the people and the shallowness of the people and they don’t have a mind of their own so it’s just whatever’s hot, and I can feel accepted in it in the moment is what I’m gonna do.  It’s like with jerkin’ and wear skinny yellow jeans?  Nobody, but it was hot for the moment.

Grandmilly:

Yo, a lot of niggas were wearing those jeans bro.

Big Zeem:  

See, but that’s what I’m saying.  That’s a troll mind.  Like Ghost has a song where he says “you got a choice in America that’s be a mental slave, in jail, or dead bruh.”  That’s real talk.  You have a choice, but your choices ain’t that really that great.  Like if you tell me eat shit or starve, you’re not really giving me choices.  You’re putting me in a hard spot, because nobody really wants to eat shit, and a lot of people are eating shit just to go along with the get along and be cool.  That’s the hypebeast shit.  It’s like high school man.  But my fault Jay, as soon as you said A$AP I cut you off, I didn’t mean to cut you off.

JB: It’s all good.  I just know there’s been some tension between SpaceGhost and A$AP and I just wanted to get a sense of whether being in New York you see that tension more directly, or not really.

Matt Stoops:

No comment.  I wish them niggas the best luck and some more originality I guess.  That’s all I can say.  Stop hatin’.

Grandmilly:

They’re runnin’ around doing a lot of fuckin’ kiddie shit.  I mean a lot of kiddie shit.

Big Zeem:

I don’t even really speak on them dudes like.  My thing is I come from a whole different side of this whole thing.  Because like, I knew A$AP, but I met A$AP through Ghost when he moved to New York and when he left I was chillin’ with A$AP, you know those were the homies and just to see the whole situation and go the way it go, you know it’s not cool, but like I said many a times, real gangsters sit down and have talks.  If it was really like how Rocky and them were saying it was like it just needs to be a sit down and talk.  I know Ghost is down to talk.  So it’s at where it’s at.

Grandmilly:

Yeah you’d just need to have the right conversation with a nigga and it would change everything.

Big Zeem:

But like, it’s no hate from us.  Like you won’t see an A$AP Grandmilly diss song and we’re not gonna diss A$AP, like it’s nothing.  It’s straight silence, it’s just no words.  Because you know, it’s like bloods and crips we just know what time it is with each other, it’s not no war, but most of the time if we see them it’s a mutual effect.

Grandmilly:

Yeah, but niggas is just is all tight, and niggas gonna get shot, and niggas gonna die.  I mean I personally don’t think it’s gonna go that way, because nobody is really about killing nobody.  I know niggas who’s really about killing people and nobody who I think is in this situation is about picking up a gun and killing nobody.  So I’m not even worried about it.

Big Zeem:

Like the homie Soulja Mook said, like “yo, I never met Rocky, I want to meet him and address him on the court.”  Like not from this situation.  I mean, it’s not like Ghost is saying, “Fuck Rocky,” but you gotta look at the situation and say, somebody’s talking about your brother, what you really gonna do?  You gonna vibe with them and chill with them and drink coffee with him and chill?  And play playstation?  Or you just gonna look at it like damn, that’s my brother, we should definitely not be seen with each other it’s whatever, whatever right now.  But I mean honestly, we wish the best for them dudes.  And I like Rocky, because Rocky is creative, you can’t knock his creative side.  Like his visuals?  Fucking superb – like you can’t doubt that or deny that.  It’s just a situation where it’s like damn, you know, ahh, fuck it.  You know?  A$AP Ferg gonna be one of the greatest out of A$AP.  Mark my words.

Grandmilly:

 Nah, I think NA$T gonna be that nigga man.

Big Zeem:

Nah, I don’t know Ferg got a sound nobody heard in a while man.  Or at all, actually.

Grandmilly:

Nah, NA$T gonna be that nigga man.

Big Zeem:

Nah, NA$T is hard though, I ain’t gonna lie.  You can put that in the interview too.  I said A$AP NA$T is tough – he can rap.

Grandmilly:

Yeah, you gotta make sure you let it be known that that nigga’s the man.  He’s better than Rocky to me, to keep it so real.

JB: Tell us a little bit about the situation that lead to Mike Dece and Ruben leaving Raider Klan.

Matt Stoops:

They were out here chilling with me.  The whole Metro Zu was out here chilling with me, and like Mike’s kind of young you know and he’s not from here.  I don’t think he’s ever been to New York.  So when he came to New York he was just like wiling out.  And I was like, “yo, you gotta chill,” and then I spoke to Purrp.  And he was just wiling out doing crazy shit, which is cool, because he’s young and shit, but you can’t run around somebody else’s city acting crazy.  So I was talking to Purrp one day and he was like, “Yo, how’s Mike Dece doing is he alright?” And I was like, “Nah, that fools wiling out.”  And I guess like, Purrp doesn’t smoke weed or do any drugs, he just drinks, he’s not really into like seeing the homies do drugs and shit.  And like Mike Dece’s a big drug addict and shit and he was like, ‘I don’t like that shit,’ and he was like ‘I think Mike Dece should be out of Raider Klan.’  And that’s it.  And like Ruben’s his right hand man so he just left with him.

JB: Talk for just a minute about Trayvon Martin and what that whole situation means for Raider Klan and why you have all stood up to speak on that situation a be a part of the response to that situation.

Matt Stoops:

First off, Purrp was really good friends with Trayvon Martin’s best friend Nick.  I guess he felt some type of personal connection.  That shit’s fucked up, that shit happens a lot and nobody really pays attention to it.  And I feel like when shit like that happens it hurts us, because we’re young and shit and that shit could happen to one of us.  Purrp definitely felt some type of personal connection with that whole situation, but I can’t speak on it that much.  It’s fucked up.

Big Zeem:

Young black brother, just got taken down and it’s not even a situation of black and white, it’s just a situation of life. You feel me?

Grandmilly:

You I heard the nigga Hodgy, say some crazy shit, but it’s so true.  Hodgy Beats from Odd Future said, “If a seventeen year old nigga could beat your ass, you deserve to get your ass beat.”  That’s like no if’s, and’s, or but’s my nigga.  If you’re letting a little kid beat you up my nigga, you deserve that ass whooping.  You’ve got to shoot a seventeen year old kid, because he’s getting the best of you in a fist fight?

Big Zeem:

I don’t know about all that.  It’s like, that young man could be killed and nobody say or do nothing.  It has nothing to really do with color, because honestly speaking if Zimmerman was black, nobody would care.  It would not be in the news,  nobody would care, there’d be no Al Sharpton, nobody would have cared if Zimmerman was a black man who shot a black kid.  You feel me?  But because Zimmerman was a white man and that kid was black and that kid was dead ass right, he didn’t do nothing wrong, and the way they’re treating it, it’s showing us something.  It’s showing us that this system, it don’t mean nothing, because they don’t care.  There’s not no justice, and you’re not going to get no justice.

Grandmilly:

I don’t know man.  I don’t understand why that can take place in America… I don’t understand.

Big Zeem:

It happens every day.  Because shit, we’re from New York.  I remember when Sean Bell got killed, they tore Queens down, that shit almost got burned to the ground when Sean Bell got killed.  Nobody did nothing.  50 shots.  I used to live in the Bronx, Amadou Diallo.  I can name veterans all day, I can name G’s all day, you feel me?  In the hood, all day from gang violence and nobody cares.

JB: What are your five favorite Raider Klan tapes:

Grandmilly:

1) SpaceGhostPurrp – SpaceGhostPurrp – Blackland Radio 66.6

2) Ethelwulf – The Wolf Gang’s Rodolphe

3) SpaceGhostPurrp – The God of Black EP

4) Key Nyata – Two Phonkey

5) Amber London – 1994 EP

Big Zeem:

1) Ethelwulf – The Wolf Gang’s Rodolphe

2) SpaceGhostPurrp – Blackland Radio 66.6

3) Amber London – 1994 EP

4) Lil Ugly Mane – Mista Thug Isolation

5) Grandmilly – Bandanas & Black Magic

Matt Stoops:

1) SpaceGhostPurrp – The Nasa Tape

2) Key Nyata – Two Phonkey

3) SpaceGhostPurrp – Blackland Radio 66.6

4)  Grandmilly – Bandanas & Black Magic

5) Denzel Curry – Strictly 4 My R.A.I.D.E.R.Z.

JB: Why did you want to go lo-fi or what appeals to you and the other Raider Klan members about the lo-fi vibe?

Matt Stoops:

I feel like we all, or most of us grew up listening to like old lo-fi shit like that, like you know old school Memphis rappers, not even like Three 6, but like before Three 6.  And you know we all grew up listening to that sound.  And most of the rappers in the Klan are from the south, so they already had that feel growing up listening to that music and shit like that.

Big Zeem:

Honestly speaking, the lo-fi shit, we can’t help, because we don’t have managers and budgets and shit of that nature, so motherfuckers is recording in their macbooks, through their macbook headphones or we’ll record in a garage with a bunch of bricks around a booth or something.  So I mean people record anywhere now.  Like who really pays for studio time and goes to a studio now?  When you can really get five hundred or six hundred dollars and build your own studio in your crib, so that’s how we got caught up in the lo-fi shit, basically doing production on our own and shit.  Plus, lo-fi just sounds hella good, though.  Certain albums should just be lo-fi.  Like we kind of don’t want to do lo-fi for The Truman Show, but it’s kind of looking like it.  We don’t want everything to be lo-fi, it’s just that certain things got a certain feel.

JB: So is there a conscious decision to make it sound grimy in homage to the music of the 90’s or does that not really come into play?

Big Zeem:

Yeah to a certain extent.  You know that’s how the music was then, it was kind of, for them it was high def, but for us now it’s lo-fi.  You know what I mean?  It just gives it the 90’s feel again.  Like you listen to Amber London’s “Low MF Key,” that just has a real lo-fi vibe.  Even if you watch our videos, yeah the video may be shot in 1080p, but watch it in 240, and you’ll see why it was shot the way it was shot.  If you watch Amber London’s “Low MF Key” video or watch Purrp’s “God of Black,” if you watch it in 240, you’ll see why it was shot the way it was shot.  That’s the real essence of the video, because it looks like a 90’s video at that point, under those settings.  It gives it that feel.  So with the music it has to reflect.  I can’t say I’m a 90’s rapper and I’m on techno beats rapping like dupstep and shit.  Or even for me, I can’t make clothes saying this was established in 1990’s Controlled Addiction, but it’s looking like the new Givenchy line, it just wouldn’t look right.  Like I’m big on logos and prints and all that, bringing that whole thing back.  I was just at a thrift shop and I just bought a whole FUBU outfit and we’d be on tour with that.  But yeah it is kind of a conscious decision at times.  At times it’s just a feeling and it just feels right, but a lot of times it’s like yeah let’s do it like this.

JB: Have you had any humbling experiences where other older artists have started to take note of you guys yet?

Big Zeem:

Actually it’s funny I just met the Leaders of the New School dudes the other day, you know Charlie Brown, and them.  And they were telling me they liked Milly’s music and shit and said a lot of the older hip hop heads in Long Island really gravitate towards our music.  Which is a shocker for me, because I wouldn’t really expect them to fuck with us, because we’re some young rebellious motherfuckers.

JB: But at the same time, when they came out, they were young rebellious motherfuckers too.

Big Zeem:

Yeah that shit is true, you just got me there.  Now I can see why they fuck with us.  You know what tripped me up was the first time we met Wu-Tang.  And they just really fucked with us.  Like GZA really genuinely liked Purrp, and like he really knew Purrp’s songs.  That’s why I like them old heads man.  Those dudes was cool, those dudes were down to earth, they’re not trying to fight for something like some little kids.

To read more on the Raider Klan check out this article on them as well as Part 1: Memphis (Ethelwulf, Chris Travis, & Yung Raw) and Part 3: Southwest (Amber London, Chris Travis, Yung Raw)

Comments
  1. […] Interview: Raider Klan | Rvidxr Klvn Part 2: New York (Matt Stoops, Grandmilly, Big Zeem) […]

  2. […] Interview: Raider Klan | Rvidxr Klvn Part 2: New York (Matt Stoops, Grandmilly, Big Zeem) […]

  3. […] Prvyxrs, & Incvntvtixns. And my interviews with the Raider Klan members (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3).  You can also download SpaceGhostPurrp’s God of Black free of […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s